Keynote Speakers

2019 Keynote Speakers

Open Plenary:

Dr. Enid Lee

Enid Lee is an anti-racist professional development specialist, leadership coach and writer. She consults internationally on equitable education and supports educators in preparing all students to create and experience a world with greater justice, joy and generosity.

Her publications include Letters to Marcia: A Teachers’ Guide to Anti-Racist Education, Checking and Changing My Systems for Equity and “Anti-Racist Teaching“ in the Encyclopedia of Diversity in Education.

She is the co-editor of Beyond Heroes and Holidays: A Practical Guide to K-12 Anti-Racist Multicultural Education and Staff Development.

Enid has been the recipient of several awards for her path-breaking work in anti-racist education and community building among Black communities and immigrant parents. She received an Honorary Doctor of Laws from Queen’s University, Canada; was named Multicultural Educator of the Year, U.S and is included in 100 Accomplished Black Canadian Women.

Enid is a Virtual Scholar with Teaching for Change in Washington, DC and in real time lives in Toronto, Canada and Santa Cruz, California.

In spare moments, she enjoys sitting outdoors without shoes and reading books for children of all ages.

Dr. Ana Hernández

Ana Hernández is the CSUSM Associate Professor of Multilingual & Multicultural Education, the Program Coordinator for the Bilingual Authorization, Online Dual Language Certificate, and Multicultural Specialist Certificate in the School of Education. She is the co-coordinator of the Multiple Subject Credential program and earned a doctorate in Educational Leadership from the Joint Doctoral Program at the University of California in San Diego and CSUSM. She is also the director of Project ACCEPT (Aligning the Common Core for English Learners, Parents & Teachers – a US Department of Education National Professional Development Grant).

Her work in bilingual teacher preparation stems from 32 years of teaching in California public schools as a bilingual/dual language teacher in K-8 grades. In higher education, she involves her teacher candidates in community in engaged scholarship, global networks, and social justice and equity action plans. Dr. Hernández’s research examines instructional practices and cross-cultural equity in dual language education. Her publications have been featured in a variety of peer-reviewed journals and edited books. She is one of the founders and past-President of the Association for Two-Way and Dual Language Education (ATDLE) and an active member of ATDLE’s Advisory Committee. In addition, she is a national trainer and consultant for dual language education.

In her career, Hernández has received various awards, including the CSU Chancellor’s Doctoral Incentive Program, San Diego County Office of Education’s Innovative Video in Education (iVIE) Award, CSUSM’s Distinguished Teacher in Residence, CABE State Teacher of the Year, Two-Way CABE Teacher of the Year and Valley Center-Pauma Unified School District’s Teacher of the Year.

Luis Versalles

Luis is the Director of Pre K-12 District Partnerships with Pacific Educational Group he leads their work in pre K-12 educational systems across the country in making the ideal of racial equity a reality. As a member of the consulting team at PEG, he designs and delivers individualized, comprehensive support for school districts in the form of leadership training, coaching, and consulting. Working at all levels from the superintendent to beginning teachers, he supports educators as they focus on heightening their awareness of institutional racism and developing effective strategies for closing the achievement gap in their schools.

Pacific Educational Group is committed to achieving racial equity in education. They engage in sustained partnerships with educational organizations to transform beliefs, behaviors, and results so people of all races can achieve at their highest levels and live their most empowered lives.

Why Examine and Address Race? Race matters–in society and in our schools. It is critical for educators to address racial issues in order to uncover personal and institutional biases that prevent all students, and especially students of color, from reaching their fullest potential.

One of his personal and professional passions is supporting school systems in the design and implementation of racially, culturally, and linguistically equitable learning environments. His work focuses on organizational coherence and alignment that supports accelerated learning outcomes for all students.

Friday Morning Plenary:

Jeff Zwiers

Jeff is a senior researcher at the Stanford Graduate School of Education and the director of professional development for Understanding Language, a research and professional learning project focused on improving instruction and assessment of all students, with an extra emphasis on serving the needs of linguistically and culturally diverse learners. He consults for national and international teacher development projects that promote language, literacy, lesson design, and formative assessment practices. His current research focuses on developing classroom instruction that fosters rich communication and productive academic conversations across disciplines and grade levels.

He work with schools, districts, counties, and states on the topics above. He also gives professional development workshops, keynotes, and presentations for teachers, instructional coaches, and leaders. He is also an instructor for online professional development courses that are offered by Stanford University.

Saturday Morning Plenary:

Kim Potowski

Kim Potowski is a professor of Hispanic linguistics in the Department of Hispanic and Italian Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She is also a faculty affiliate in the Latin American and Latino Studies Program, the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, and in the Social Justice Initiative. Also she is the founding ​​director of the Language in Context Research Group. Since 2009 Kim has served as Executive Editor of the journal Spanish in Context.

Most broadly, she is interested in the promotion of minority languages and multilingualism, particularly via elementary schooling. Her work focuses on Spanish in the United States, including factors that influence intergenerational language transmission, connections between language and identity, and heritage language education. Some of her recent research topics include:

* Language development in dual immersion schools
* Mexican and Puerto Rican Spanish in Chicago, and the language and identity of mixed “Mexi-Rican” individuals
* Teaching heritage languages, particularly Spanish in the U.S.
* Spanish use in Chicago quinceañera celebrations
* The use of “Spanglish” in commercially published greeting cards

Here is a list of her invited (non-conference) presentations and some of here current research projects – Click here.

Expert Sessions:

Dr. Kate Kinsella

Dr. Kate Kinsella is an adjunct faculty member in San Francisco State University’s Center for Teacher Efficacy.
Her extensive national consultancy, training, and publications focus upon improving achievement of less proficient readers and immigrant youth. She provides guidance to state departments and districts on evidence based instructional practices to promote gains for English Learners and under resourced students in states as varied as New York, California and Texas. A teacher’s teacher, Dr. Kinsella has maintained active classroom involvement by teaching high school English Learners in her University’s Step to College Program and providing regular in-class coaching and model lessons. Her areas of particular professional interest are academic oral language, vocabulary, reading and writing development for career and college readiness.

Dr. Kinsella is particularly proud of the instructional programs she has recently developed for English learners and less proficient readers. English 3D (2011) and READ 180: Next Generation (2011), published by Scholastic, address the advanced academic oral language and writing needs of adolescent English learners. The Academic Vocabulary Toolkit (2012) published by National Geographic Learning develops mastery of high-utility vocabulary for secondary school success. Dr. Kinsella also served as the architect and pedagogy guide for Oxford University’s Content Area Picture Dictionaries for newcomers in grades K-8 and Pearson Longman’s entire suite of dictionaries for K-12 English learners.

Dr. Kathryn Lindholm Leary

Dr. Kathryn Lindholm-Leary received her Ph.D. at UCLA, where she worked at the Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center and the Center for Language Education and Research.  She is currently Professor Emerita of Child and Adolescent Development at San Jose State University, where she taught for 28 years. At San Jose State, Kathryn received a Teacher-Scholar award, was a finalist for the President’s Scholar award, and has received a variety of other awards for her teaching, service, and research.  Her research interests focus on understanding the cognitive, language, psycho-social, and societal factors that influence student achievement, with a particular emphasis on culturally and linguistically diverse students. More recently, she worked with the National Academy of Sciences in their report on the development of English/Dual language learners, and her research was cited by the U.S. Department of Education in the Federal Register.

Dr. Lindholm-Leary has worked with two-way immersion and other bilingual programs for the past 30 years and during that time has evaluated over 50 programs and helped to establish programs in over 60 school districts in 12 states. Dr. Lindholm-Leary has consulted with various state departments of education, the US Department of Education, and other professional organizations and community agencies.  She has authored or co-authored four books and many chapters and journal articles on the topics of dual language education and child bilingualism, and has presented her findings at over 125 local, state, national and international conferences.